© 2017 by Cristina Sala Ripoll, unless otherwise stated

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ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE

 

Microorganisms can develop resistance to the drugs that we currently use to treat them. This is a problem because it makes certain diseases more difficult to cure.

Researchers of the Discovery Centre at the University of Dundee are working on developing new compounds that might help fight these "super-bugs".

First, they need to understand the mechanisms that make this resistance possible. D

r. Llabres and Dr. Zachariae from the Centre of Antimicrobial Resistance are researching one of them: the Gram negative efflux pump.

To help raise public awareness of Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR), I created a series of images as a visual way to tell the story, from the human level to the molecular scale.

SCROLL TO DISCOVER THE MECHANISMS OF RESISTANCE!

WHAT DOES AMR HAVE TO DO WITH US HUMANS?

AMR threatens the prevention and treatment of an increasing range of diseases, and it affects many countries regardless of their income. Treatment becomes more expensive and less effective, and mortality increases. The following infographic contains general information about AMR from the social and economic perspective. To learn more, you can view the full Prezi.

THE BACTERIA

The second image shows Escherichia coli, one of the bacteria that are becoming increasingly resistant to our antibiotics.

These could be causing a disease to the patient in the previous image. This helps create a connection between our human perspective and the cellular world.

 

THE MECHANISMS OF RESISTANCE

How do they do it?

This image shows the different mechanisms that enable Gram negative bacteria to become resistant to antibiotics. It enables the speaker to very quickly explain the cause of the resistance to the audience.

THE EFFLUX PUMP

The final image shows one of the resistance mechanisms in more detail. This is the protein that Dr.Zachariae's group are trying to understand in order to find a way to avoid bacterial resistance to antibiotics.

The last two images were featured in the lecture by Mike Ferguson, Regius Professor of Life Sciences ''What is the University of Dundee doing about infectious diseases?'' on May 2016.

The images were made available to the researchers for use in their own presentations. Additionally, I created a Prezi displaying all of the images with some additional information about antimicrobial resistance, providing an engaging way of divulgating the research.

Progress: Coming soon